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dc.contributor.authorTakamori, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHamlin, MJen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKieser, DCen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKing, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHume, Pen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorYamazaki, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHachiya, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, PDen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-02T03:42:34Z
dc.date.available2022-06-02T03:42:34Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research: March 2022 - Volume 36 - Issue 3 - p 710-716, doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000003523
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/15187
dc.description.abstractTakamori, S, Hamlin, MJ, Kieser, DC, King, D, Hume, P, Yamazaki, T, Hachiya, M, and Olsen, PD. Senior club-level rugby union player's positional movement performance using individualized velocity thresholds and accelerometer-derived impacts in matches. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2020-Game demands of professional rugby union players have been well documented; however, there is minimal game demand information using individualized velocity thresholds and collision loads, particularly for amateurs. This study investigated movement patterns of 20 male amateur rugby players during 16 senior premier division one matches using global positioning system (GPS) devices sampling at 10 Hz. Derived GPS variables included distances, velocities, sprinting, and impacts. Data files from 86 player games (≥60 minutes of play per game) were categorized into broad (forwards and backs) and specific (front row, second row, back row, half back, inside back, and outside back) positional groups for analysis. It was most likely that backs covered more distance in the high-speed running (>60% maximal velocity) zone (502 ± 157 m) compared with forwards (238 ± 147 m) (100/0/0%, chances of positive/trivial/negative differences, effect size [ES] = 1.3), performed more striding (backs 1,116 ± 240, forwards 954 ± 240 m, 96/4/0%, ES = 0.5), and sprinting (backs 121 ± 58, forwards 90 ± 65 m, 93/7/0%, ES = 0.5). However, forwards had higher collision loads (35 ± 12 arbitrary units) compared with backs (20 ± 6, 99.9/0.1/0%, ES = 1.3) with back row forwards completing the highest collision load of any playing position (40 ± 13). Our example match movement performance and impact information is valuable to coaches and support staff in preparing player profiles for similar-level rugby players to help manage their workloads.en_NZ
dc.languageengen_NZ
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkinsen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Fulltext/2022/03000/Senior_Club_Level_Rugby_Union_Player_s_Positional.16.aspx
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Two Commerce Square, 2001 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103 U.S.A. All rights reserved. Copyright in the documents ("Contents") on the Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Web Servers is owned by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (LWW), unless otherwise indicated. LWW hereby authorizes you to copy documents published by LWW on the World Wide Web for non-commercial uses within your organization only. In consideration of this authorization, you agree that any copy of these documents which you make shall retain all copyright and other proprietary notices contained herein.
dc.subjectGPS technology; Game analysis; Collision; Conditioning; Distance; Sprint
dc.titleSenior Club-Level Rugby Union Player’s Positional Movement Performance Using Individualized Velocity Thresholds and Accelerometer-Derived Impacts in Matchesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/JSC.0000000000003523en_NZ
pubs.elements-id372493
aut.relation.journalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Researchen_NZ


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