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dc.contributor.authorThorburn, Een_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMilne, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDeuchar, Cen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-17T03:12:18Z
dc.date.available2021-08-17T03:12:18Z
dc.date.copyright2021-03-31en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationGrowing marine ecotourism: Developing marine ecotourism that embraces regenerative principles and supports a blue economy. Retrieved from: https://www.sustainableseaschallenge.co.nz/our-research/growing-marine-ecotourism/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14426
dc.description.abstractOverview Before Covid-19, tourism contributed 9.8% GDP, $40.9 billion and 14.4% national employment (StatsNZ, 2019). While Covid-19 has diminished the country’s most valuable export sector (tourism), it is also a catalyst to develop these types of activities. Our extensive coastline and unique marine environment places Aotearoa New Zealand in an excellent position to develop marine ecotourism that embraces regenerative principles and supports a blue economy. But our understanding of marine ecotourism and how it connects to the blue economy is lacking. Marine ecotourism is an area often overlooked by policy makers and the connections to the spiritual, cultural, social, environmental, and economic well-being of communities is largely unexplored. To develop marine ecotourism activity that embraces regeneration and supports a blue economy, we need to understand where we are now, where we want to go, and how we will get there. Drawing on mātauranga Māori, this project aims to develop marine ecotourism from low impact ecosystem-based management (EBM) principles. Innovative approaches will be adopted to identify, investigate, and achieve the desired outcomes. Key to this is forming a network that enables cross-sectoral learning and can drive and enact change. We will work in partnership with iwi, industry, government and community, to: establish a baseline of marine ecotourism activity co-create an actionable definition construct collaborative measures for ‘success’ and test this in North and South Island case studies. This research will include wānanga with case communities and mātauranga experts in factors that contribute to te Taiao, and participation in existing marine ecotourism activities. An iterative process of adaption and collaboration across sectors and cultures will enable knowledge exchange and learning to develop tools and frameworks that support the development of marine ecotourism.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Challenge (NIWA)en_NZ
dc.publisherSustainable Seas National Science Challenge.
dc.relation.urihttps://www.sustainableseaschallenge.co.nz/assets/dms/Reports/Developing-marine-ecotourism-for-a-sustainable-blue-economy-a-literature-review-/Marine-ecotourism-literature-review_May-2021_For-Upload-to-WEB.pdfen_NZ
dc.rights© 2021 Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge. All Rights Reserved. Except where provided otherwise for specific items or collections of content (either as specified below in the terms or within specific items or collections on the Website), we license you to reproduce and share this material for non-commercial purposes in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International Licence (CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0). Under the terms of this licence, you must attribute the material to the Challenge as follows: Sustainable Seas Challenge - sustainableseaschallenge.co.nz
dc.titleDeveloping Marine Ecotourism for a Sustainable Blue Economy: A Literature Reviewen_NZ
dc.typeCommissioned Report
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
aut.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
pubs.elements-id431881


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