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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Gen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDevine, Nen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-19T02:36:37Z
dc.date.available2019-08-19T02:36:37Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWaikato Journal of Education, 24(1), 93-101.
dc.identifier.issn1173-6135en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/12736
dc.description.abstractThis article unpacks and critiques the scholarship of Elizabeth Rata on the politics of knowledge in education. Rata represents a widespread, though covert, influence within the global academy of an imperialist form of philosophical universalism which has particular significance for Aotearoa New Zealand due to her vocal opposition to Kaupapa Māori education and Māori politics more generally. This article uses critical discourse analysis (CDA) to focus on the arguments of one key article, in order to expose its philosophical weaknesses. Our analysis shows that Rata’s scholarship is based on misconceptions of several key terms and concepts, which inexorably lead to inadequate arguments and invalid conclusions, and undermine the cogency of her claims about the ‘dangers’ of Kaupapa Māori education.
dc.publisherWilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Researchen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://wje.org.nz/index.php/WJE/article/view/665
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
dc.titleA Critique of Rata on the Politics of Knowledge and Māori Educationen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.15663/wje.v24i1.665en_NZ
aut.relation.endpage101
aut.relation.issue1en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage92
aut.relation.volume24en_NZ
pubs.elements-id362878
aut.relation.journalWaikato Journal of Educationen_NZ


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