Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Jen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-07T23:31:50Z
dc.date.available2019-03-07T23:31:50Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationSet 2018: no. 2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/12334
dc.description.abstractBuilding on earlier work in Set on “confusion” around the term constructivism in education, this article explores four different meanings of constructivism, looking at their very different origins and purposes. It argues that mixing up these meanings has produced the confusion identified in the earlier article. The article also suggests that constructivism has been pushed to its limits as a framework for thinking about teaching, learning and/or knowledge development in 21st century schools, and another idea is now needed. The article reviews Bereiter and Scardamalia’s ‘knowledge-building’ concept as one possible contender.
dc.publisherThe New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER)
dc.relation.urihttps://www.nzcer.org.nz/node/60412en_NZ
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher's Version).
dc.titleUntangling Constructivism, Knowledge, and Knowledge-building for ‘future-oriented’ Teachingen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.18296/set.0095en_NZ
pubs.elements-id321040
aut.relation.journalSet: Research Information for Teachers Online Firsten_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record